Contain Yourself: Prepare for Fall with Container Garden Ideas


Container gardens can be a great addition to your client’s landscape, especially with the onset of fall.

Whether it’s working in a few fall edibles, succulents, or traditional seasonal options, there are many designs you can implement to ensure customers have a variety of choices.

Take a look at some fantastic fall design concepts you can create that your clients are sure to love throughout the season.

Chrysanthemums

Moms are a staple in most fall arrangements, and it’s easy to see why they’re so popular. Not only do they offer bright and bold pops of color, but their shape also makes them ideal when trying to mass plant in areas.

With the arrival of autumn also comes the trend to decorate with squash and pumpkins, which pair well with bronze and orange mums.

When choosing moms, keep in mind that there are two types you can choose from: rustic and florist. Hardy Moms are traditionally referred to as Garden Moms, and experts agree that they will be most useful when using them for landscaping purposes, as they are capable of producing underground flights and better. thrive in winter.

Florist moms are also called cutting moms, and although they will produce larger flowers, they will produce little, if any, underground fly.

To help your clients get the most out of their moms, be sure to choose cultivars based on their flowering times, and remember to coordinate those flowering times with the length of fall for the region you are looking for. serve.

“If you are using moms in your pots, try buying them when the buds are cracking,” landscape designer Amy Wilbur of Sweet Dirt Designs told Houzz. “This will give you the longest lifespan of a short-lived plant. “

Learn more about planting and proper care for moms here.

Unique planting options

Not all fall containers are made the same, and with the abundance of plant options to choose from, your customers are sure to have something to brag about after your design is complete.

But don’t just think inside the box when choosing what type of plants and planters to use. Keep in mind that you can also have different sizes when it comes to containers, which means your clients can customize their designs to fit the overall feel of the landscape. If your clients are looking to add a little height and layers to their garden, setting up a taller planter could also be a good solution.

With larger planters, you’ll really get the chance to use the thriller aspect of the traditional combination of thriller, fill, and spill. To really add height to the container, take advantage of the seasonal colors and ornamental grasses when creating the planter.

Or if your customers have shown an interest in dipping their toes in the waters of edible gardening, why not incorporate a few ornamental and kale options into the mix? Not only will these veggies provide a treat to watch, but they can also provide a treat to snack on.

Lean into the season

When creating your client’s container design, don’t be afraid to really go all out with screaming elements. For example, using brightly colored pumpkins as the centerpiece of an arrangement can be a perfect way to grab attention, then adding overflowing greenery, purple-black foliage, and another fall-colored flower for really tie everything together.

“I think putting something unusual in a container gives it drama,” Garden Stories designer Stephanie Town told Houzz.Shutterstock 163190240

But fall isn’t always about brighter oranges and reds. Sometimes you can use darker colors in an arrangement while still getting the drop effect you want.

“The interesting and unusual color combinations will always read fall as long as the majority of the elements are fall materials,” Kathy Molnar Simpson of KMS Gardens and Design told Houzz. “The colors of the majority of the elements must have some relation with each other. I think complementary combinations, rather than opposing color combinations, tend to work best in the fall.

Darker colors like deep blues, purples, and lavenders paired with a slate gray pot can really create a striking container, and you can also add taller ornamental grasses to add a wispy element of height.